The Animals’ Friend

The Animals’ Friend

Twenty-two societies pay tribute to the work of Mr. Ernest Bell.

It was a happy thought on the part of someone to arrange that Mr. Ernest Bell’s relinquishment of his thirty years’ editorship of the Animals’ Friend should be celebrated at a kind of “family party” to which representatives of the many societies with which he has been more or less—actively connected during a long life should be invited. Mr. Bell’s generosity in the cause of animal welfare has been great, but so also have been his wisdom and his sympathy. Yes, indeed! the modest and retiring spirit of our guest notwithstanding, our own insistent feelings demanded that we should pay tribute to them.

The “party” in question duly took place at Central Hall, Westminister, on the afternoon of Saturday, October 26th. In addition to the principle guest, there were also present Mrs. Ernest Bell and her two sisters, Mrs. Caunter and Miss von Taysen, as well as representatives of the twenty-two societies interested in calling the meeting and a large gathering of personal friends. Mr. Ernest Axon and Mr. J. H. Brazendale attended on behalf of the Vegetarian Society (Manchester), the London Vegetarian Society being represented by several of its officers and members of committee, including Mr. And Mrs. S. A Hurren, Mrs. Allinson, Mr. R. Lawson Coad, Mr. Ernest C. Clifford, and many others too numerous to mention. Mr. And Mrs. Hector Nicholls were present representatives of the Vegetarian Social Club. It was not, of course, an exclusive vegetarian gathering, but no vegetarian needs to be reminded that the guest of honour for the occasion, (himself a vegetarian for more than fifty years) has for long held high office in each of the three organisations which have just been named, and hence a large representation was to be expected.

The proceedings were mainly social in character, but there was a little speech make, Lady Cory presented Mr. Bell with an album inscribed with short addresses from the various societies which had joined together to do him honour. Of necessity, these addresses had to be very brief, and readers of The Vegetarian News many like to know that that of the London Vegetarian Society was as follows:—

The LONDON VEGETARIAN SOCIETY pays affectionate tribute to one who, for more than fifty years, has so far testified to the sincerity of his friendship for all animals, sub-human as well as human, that he has refused to eat them,

while underneath the following lines were quoted from Arthur Symons:—

When I hear
Crying of oxen that, in deadly fear,
Rough men, with cruel dogs about them, drive
Into the torture-house of death alive,
How can I sit under a tree and read
A happy idle book, and take no heed?

Appropriately enough, an address inscribed at the beginning of the album, conveyed a general tribute from the subscribers, hailed Mr. Bell himself as “The Animals’ Friend,” and we are tempted to print it forthwith. In justice to others, however, who may wish to do likewise, we defer publication of it, and also of Mr. Bell’s reply, until our December number. The album was bound in imitation leather, its pages being of vegetable parchment. Miss Wade (to whose work, not only on the Little Animals’ Friend, but also on the Animals’ Friend itself of recent months, it is only fair to pay tribute) read letters of goodwill from a number of well-known leaders in the animal welfare movement unable to be present. Fervent wish was expressed that, by some means, publication of the Animals’ Friend might be continued. Quite possibly we may be able to make further reference next month.

Two sentences from the letters read by Miss Wade especially deserve to be quoted. One of the letters referred to Mr. Bell appropriately as “the Humane Warrior,” while another spoke of his “beautiful, tolerant spirit,” and expressed the hope that it might “continue to be a guiding light on the humanitarian movement no matter how much he might try to withdraw from active participation in it.” Militancy and a tolerant spirit do not, as every one knows, always go together. The synthesis, however, when it does occur, is a peculiarly happy one, and, as every friend will agree, it is one in whose achievement Mr. Bell pre-eminently succeeds. It will be the devout wish of all that he benign influence it bespeaks may yet be exercised for many years to come.

F. W.

The Vegetarian News, Vol. 9 No. 107, November 1929, pp. 379-380

Notes

Twenty-two societies pay tribute to the work of Mr. Ernest Bell.

It was a happy thought on the part of someone to arrange that Mr. Ernest Bell’s relinquishment of his thirty years’ editorship of the Animals’ Friend should be celebrated at a kind of “family party” to which representatives of the many societies with which he has been more or less—actively connected during a long life should be invited. Mr. Bell’s generosity in the cause of animal welfare has been great, but so also have been his wisdom and his sympathy. Yes, indeed! the modest and retiring spirit of our guest notwithstanding, our own insistent feelings demanded that we should pay tribute to them.

The “party” in question duly took place at Central Hall, Westminster, on the afternoon of Saturday, October 26th. In addition to the principle guest, there were also present Mrs. Ernest Bell and her two sisters, Mrs. Caunter and Miss von Taysen, as well as representatives of the twenty-two societies interested in calling the meeting and a large gathering of personal friends. Mr. Ernest Axon and Mr. J. H. Brazendale attended on behalf of the Vegetarian Society (Manchester), the London Vegetarian Society being represented by several of its officers and members of committee, including Mr. And Mrs. S. A Hurren, Mrs. Allinson, Mr. R. Lawson Coad, Mr. Ernest C. Clifford, and many others too numerous to mention. Mr. And Mrs. Hector Nicholls were present representatives of the Vegetarian Social Club. It was not, of course, an exclusive vegetarian gathering, but no vegetarian needs to be reminded that the guest of honour for the occasion, (himself a vegetarian for more than fifty years) has for long held high office in each of the three organisations which have just been named, and hence a large representation was to be expected.

The proceedings were mainly social in character, but there was a little speech make, Lady Cory presented Mr. Bell with an album inscribed with short addresses from the various societies which had joined together to do him honour. Of necessity, these addresses had to be very brief, and readers of The Vegetarian News many like to know that that of the London Vegetarian Society was as follows:—

The LONDON VEGETARIAN SOCIETY pays affectionate tribute to one who, for more than fifty years, has so far testified to the sincerity of his friendship for all animals, sub-human as well as human, that he has refused to eat them,

while underneath the following lines were quoted from Arthur Symons:—

When I hear
Crying of oxen that, in deadly fear,
Rough men, with cruel dogs about them, drive
Into the torture-house of death alive,
How can I sit under a tree and read
A happy idle book, and take no heed?

Appropriately enough, an address inscribed at the beginning of the album, conveyed a general tribute from the subscribers, hailed Mr. Bell himself as “The Animals’ Friend,” and we are tempted to print it forthwith. In justice to others, however, who may wish to do likewise, we defer publication of it, and also of Mr. Bell’s reply, until our December number. The album was bound in imitation leather, its pages being of vegetable parchment. Miss Wade (to whose work, not only on the Little Animals’ Friend, but also on the Animals’ Friend itself of recent months, it is only fair to pay tribute) read letters of goodwill from a number of well-known leaders in the animal welfare movement unable to be present. Fervent wish was expressed that, by some means, publication of the Animals’ Friend might be continued. Quite possibly we may be able to make further reference next month.

Two sentences from the letters read by Miss Wade especially deserve to be quoted. One of the letters referred to Mr. Bell appropriately as “the Humane Warrior,” while another spoke of his “beautiful, tolerant spirit,” and expressed the hope that it might “continue to be a guiding light on the humanitarian movement no matter how much he might try to withdraw from active participation in it.” Militancy and a tolerant spirit do not, as every one knows, always go together. The synthesis, however, when it does occur, is a peculiarly happy one, and, as every friend will agree, it is one in whose achievement Mr. Bell pre-eminently succeeds. It will be the devout wish of all that he benign influence it bespeaks may yet be exercised for many years to come.

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