Our Vanishing Wild Flowers

Our Vanishing Wild Flowers

In OUR VANISHING WILD FLOWERS (Watts and Co., pp. 86, 2s. 6d. net) Mr. Henry S. Salt insists the flora of a country belongs to the nation, and makes an earnest plea that as the destruction of a species becomes a national loss, and as thoughtlessness, cupidity, and lack of public spirit, collectors, botanical and “exchange” clubs, besides and growth of towns and improved methods of cultivation, are all helping towards the disappearance of rare and beautiful plants, sanctuaries should be provided for wild flowers as well as for birds and Prime Ministers. Other measures urged by Mr. Salt—and by Sir Maurice Abbot-Anderson in “An Afterword”—include the formation of a League for the Preservation and Protection of Wild Flowers, extended legislation to cope with unreasonable marauders, and systematic instruction of children in the treatment of the plants. The botanist himself is reminded that “the real and ultimate understanding of flowers is not anatomical but sympathetic.”

The Guardian, July 23, 1928, p. 5

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